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The Cost of Adding Heat and Brake Capabilities to a Non-Heated Paint Booth

Finding the right spray paint booth for your needs can be a bit tricky. The term is too broad and may cover anything, from just space and fan to state-of-the-art booth with sophisticated features and systems, Of course, you will have to choose depending on your needs.

If you’ve been reading up on spray paint booths, you may have discovered that they come in at least four types – downdraft, semi-downdraft, side-draft and crossdraft. But if the plan is to add heat and brake capabilities to a non-heated spray paint booth, you should consider this seriously as this will surely impact your overall cost.

While custom shops may not call for upgrades, you may need one if volume will likely become part of your business model. As you add heat to your paint booth, it’s important to be able to recycle it, saving you thousands of dollars yearly.

Cheaper spray paint booths often cost the most to retrofit. For instance, cross-draft booths cannot have heat provided through its doors. Major alterations will be needed and the costs can be prohibitively high. In a similar way,installing a heat recycle in specific cross-draft booths can be done, but the cost will be through the roof.

Semi-downdraft booths are easier when it comes to retrofitting for the addition of heat. As very little metal customization or on-site work must be done, installation and labor costs are minimal.

Because of the exhaust’s location (rear of the booth), adding heat recycle will be both difficult and expensive. Most certainly, the project will require significant amounts of ductwork. As the ducts of side downdraft booths run along the sidewalls, retrofitting with heat is easy. As the heater can be connected to the exhaust duct at any location, adding heat recycling is equally easy. Depending on the layout, downdraft booths also come easy in terms of adding heat and heat recycling. Installation and labor costs can be kept to a minimum, considering changes to the cabin will not be required.

In any case, make sure there’s adequate room around the booth where you decide to add heat in the future. Your building should have the right electric load, and be aware of where the power will be run so you can come up with an accurate estimate of your costs. Also make sure that the fuel that will run the booth can be brought to the heater. Finally, ensure that adding a heater is allowed by your city even if you have no such plans yet. Just by taking time to look into all of these details, your business can enjoy money and time savings in the future.

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